A Seventh-day Adventist Organization

Center for Perinatal Biology

Divisions of Physiology and Pharmacology
Department of Basic Sciences
School of Medicine
Loma Linda University


OVERVIEW

The Center for Perinatal Biology consists of a group of biomedical scientists devoted to investigation of the biology of the developing fetus and newborn infant.  The Center includes a dozen faculty members most  of  whom have appointments in the Divisions of Physiology, Pharmacology, or Biochemistry.  Many  of the members have primary or joint appointments in the Departments of Anatomy, Obstetrics and Gynecology, and Pediatrics.  In addition, eight other faculty in the basic sciences who collaborate on various research projects are associate members of the Center.  The various faculty are responsible for conducting research, as well as teaching undergraduate and graduate courses in the department/division of their primary appointment.  In addition to faculty, a number of postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students spend from two to four years in the Center to obtain basic science training in fields related to developmental physiology/neurobiology/endocrinology/immunology.  Visiting scholars from other universities also work in the Center during their sabbatical leave or for other periods.

During the past three decades the Center has evolved from a quasi-independent division of the Department of Physiology, to a "mini-institute" within the University.  Essentially all of the funds to support the Center and its research program are derived from competitive grants from the National Institutes of Health (including a major Program Project Grant), with lesser amounts from the National Science Foundation, American Heart Association, March of Dimes-Birth Defects Foundation, and other agencies. 

Without exception, the faculty of the Center for Perinatal Biology are national and international leaders in fetal and neonatal physiology and/or biochemisty, and are experts in their individual discipline.  Each investigator has an established record of productivity and innovation and is a highly gifted, competent, and established scientist in his own right.  The faculty of the Center constitute a multidisciplinary group with a unique and broad perspective which is ideal for research and training new investigators.  Each member has a strong background in the basic sciences, a major commitment to science, and to the Mission of Loma Linda University.  Each faculty member devotes 90% or more of their time to research and training.  The group has a proven record of collaboration, and work well together in a spirit of amicability and cohesion.

 CORE FACILITIES

 The Center has nine large well-equipped laboratories, seven smaller laboratories, and an operating suite.  We also have two Core Laboratories.  These include a Core Protein Laboratory for performing Western analysis, and RNA Facility for PCR, RT-PCR, in situ hybridization, and related techniques.  We also have a Core Advanced Imaging and Microscopy Laboratory with multiphoton laser scanning confocal microscope and other microscopes.  Other facilities include a conference room, an administrative office, a weighing room, a radioactive counting room, offices for investigators, and a room with study carrels for postdoctoral fellows and visiting scholars.

FACULTY

The faculty of the Center and some of their areas of expertise are as follows:

ARLIN B. BLOOD (Ph.D. Loma Linda University), Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Obstetrics and Gynecology. Fetal and Newborn Cardiovascular and Metabolic Responses to Hypoxic Stress, Bioactivity of Nitric Oxide Metabolites.

CHARLES A. DUCSAY (Ph.D. Univ. Florida, Postdoctoral Univ. Oregon), Professor of Physiology and Pediatrics.  Signal Transduction in Myometrium, Endocrine Regulation of the Initiation of Parturition, and Effect of Chronic Hypoxia on Mechanisms of Uterine Contractility.

RAVI GOYAL, MD., PhD. (Ph.D. Univ. Mississippi, Postdoctoral Loma Linda Univ.), Assist. Professor of Physiology. Role of DNA methylation, histone modifications, and non-coding RNA in differential gene regulation as a consequence of development, angiogenesis, hypoxia, and apoptosis.

LAWRENCE D. LONGO (M.D. Loma Linda Univ., Postdoctoral Univ. Southern California, UCLA, Univ. Pennsylvania), Professor of Physiology and Obstetrics and Gynecology.  Cerebrovascular Signal Transduction Mechanisms and Their Change with Development (Fetal and Neonatal), and Their Responses to Hypoxia, and Gene Expression in Brain in Response to Hypoxia/Ischemia.

 EUGENIA MATA-GREENWOOD (Ph.D. Univ. Illinois at Chicago, Postdoctorals Northwestern Univ., and Univ. California, San Diego), Assist. Professor of Pharmacology and Biochemistry.  Molecular Basis of High/Low Sensitivity to Antiinflammatory or Inflammatory Agents in Endothelial Cells, Role of Vitamin D in Models of Placenta Insufficiency. 

 WILLIAM J. PEARCE (Ph.D. Univ. Michigan, Postdoctoral UCLA), Professor of Physiology.  Regulation of Contractility - Relaxation Mechanisms of Cerebral Blood Vessels; Role of Endothelium, eNOS, cGMP, Inositol Phosphates, and Myosin Light Chain Ca2+ Sensitivity.

GORDON G. POWER (M.D. Univ. Pennsylvania, Postdoctoral Univ. Virginia, Univ. Pennsylvania), Professor of Physiology and Internal Medicine.  Regulation of Fetal Oxygen Consumption and Metabolism, the Roles of Adenosine, Nitric Oxide, and Fatty Acids.

CHRISTOPHER G. WILSON (Ph.D. Univ. of CA, Davis, Postdoctoral NIH/NINDS), Assoc. Professor of Physiology and Pediatrics. Neural control of breathing, Developmental changes in cardiorespiratory control, Neuroinflammation as a modulator of the autonomic nervous system.

SEAN M. WILSON (Ph.D. Univ. Calif. Davis, Postdoctoral Univ. Nevada, Reno), Assist. Professor of Physiology and Pharmacology.  Signal Transduction in Pulmonary Vasculature, Influence of Development and Chronic Hypoxia on Mechanisms of Pulmonary Vascular Contractility.

DALIAO XIAO, DVM, PhD. (Ph.D. Loma Linda Univ., Postdoctoral Loma Linda Univ.), Assoc. Professor of Pharmacology. Cell and molecular mechanisms of vascular contractility and fetal programming of adult hypertensive phenotype.

STEVEN M. YELLON (Ph.D. Univ. Connecticut, Postdoctoral Univ. Michigan), Professor of Physiology and Pediatrics.  Neuroendocrinology in the Fetus and Newborn, Pineal Gland Melatonin Rhythms and Reproduction, and Neuro-Immune System Interactions.

LUBO ZHANG (Ph.D. Iowa State Univ., Postdoctoral Univ. Nevada, Reno), Professor of Pharmacology and Pediatrics.  Molecular and epigenetic mechanisms of developmental programming of cardiovascular and neurological diseases.

Contact Us:

Center Office Location

Loma Linda University Medical Center

Research Wing, Room A572

Phone:  909-558-4325

Fax:  909-558-4029

Address

Center for Perinatal Biology

Loma Linda University

School of Medicine

Loma Linda, CA 92350

  

People

Lubo Zhang, Ph.D.,

Director Center for Perinatal Biology

Loma Linda University

School of Medicine

Loma Linda, CA 92350

Phone:  909-558-4325

Fax:  909-558-4029

Email:  lzhang@llu.edu

  

Brenda Kreutzer

Project Manager/Coordinator

Center for Perinatal Biology

Loma Linda University

School of Medicine

Loma Linda, CA 92350

Phone:  909-558-4325

Fax:  909-558-4029

Email:  bkreutzer@llu.edu